$17M Aetna HIV Status Privacy Class Action Settlement

Who is a Class Member

The Aetna HIV Status Privacy class action settlement includes “all persons whose Protected Health Information and/or Confidential HIV-related information was allegedly disclosed improperly by Aetna and/or Aetna-related or affiliated entities.”

If you don’t qualify for this settlement, check out our database of other class action settlements you may be eligible for.


Settlement Amount

  • $17,161,200.00

Estimated Award

  • $75, plus up to $20,000 depending on financial or non-financial harm

All 11,875 Settlement Class members who were sent the Benefit Notice will receive an automatic base payment of $75 or $500 (inclusive of the $75 payment), whichever is applicable. No claim form is needed.

Claimants may receive up to $10,000 for financial harm and up to $10,000 for non-financial harm as calculated by the Settlement Administrator, for a total maximum of up to $20,000 in addition to the minimum Base Payment described above.


Proof of Purchase

  • You will need to provide your claim number and documentations showing financial or non-financial harm, such as copies of receipts, invoices, credit card statements, medical records, insurance records, returned checks, and/or any other reasonable form of proof of non-reimbursed out-of-pocket expenses incurred as a result of the Benefit Notice.

Claim Form

  • class action lawsuits

Aetna HIV Status Disclosure Settlement Notes

  • Andrew Beckett, et al. v. Aetna Inc., et al.
  • Case No. 2:17-cv-03864
  • Pending in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania

This class action lawsuit stems from a 2017 data breach where the privacy of nearly 12,000 people insured by Aetna was compromised. Specifically, Aetna mailed letters in response to a settlement over previous violation concerns. Aetna had required members to obtain HIV medications through mail order pharmacies. This prompted lawsuits alleging the policy was discriminatory because it prevented patients taking HIV medication from receiving in-person counseling from a pharmacist as well as put their privacy at risk.

Aetna settled the lawsuits individually and changed its policy. But here’s the clincher – it mailed Benefit Notification letters to anyone who had filled a prescription for HIV meds using a large transparent glassine window envelope that exposed members sensitive HIV status information.

Aetna “carelessly, recklessly, negligently, and impermissibly revealed HIV-related information of their current and former insureds to their family, friends, roommates, landlords, neighbors, mail carriers and complete strangers,” the lawsuit states. “In the course of sending out the agreed notices, however, Aetna again failed to recognize the dangers associated with sending information about HIV medications through the mail.”

Complete details about the case and settlement are provided on the Aetna HIV Status Privacy settlement website.

Class members who wish to object to or exclude themselves from the Aetna HIV Status Privacy settlement must do so by July 31, 2018. Class members who wish to participate in the settlement must submit a claim form on or before September 29, 2018.


Important Dates

  • 9/29/18: Claim Form Deadline
  • 7/31/18: Objection or Exclusion Deadline
  • 10/15/18: Final Hearing at 9:00 am ET* (class members do not need to attend this hearing in order to receive a slice of the settlement pie).

*Settlement Class Members who wish to speak at the hearing should check www.BeckettPrivacyClassAction.com to confirm that the date or time of the Hearing has not been changed.


Contact Information

  • Mail: Settlement Administrator, c/o Angeion Group, PO Box 15860, Philadelphia, PA 19103
  • Phone: 1-877-416-7259
  • Email: BeckettPrivacyClassAction@AdministratorClassAction.com

Class Counsel


Settlement Website

Claim $25-$50 Michigan Time Magazine Class Action Settlement

Who is a Class Member

Class members of the Time Magazine Class Action Settlement include “all persons with Michigan street addresses who purchased a subscription to a Time Publication directly from Time, but in a manner other than through a Time website, between February 19, 2013 and February 19, 2016.”

Most Class Members purchased their subscriptions to Time Publications by mailing in a postcard to Time Inc.

  • Time Publications include:
  • Cooking Light
  • Coastal Living
  • Health
  • Southern Living
  • Sunset
  • This Old House
  • All You
  • Big Picture
  • Essence
  • Edge
  • Entertainment Weekly
  • Fortune
  • Golf
  • InStyle
  • Travel & Leisure
  • Time
  • Time for Kids
  • People
  • People En Español
  • People Style
  • Money
  • Sports Illustrated
  • Sports Illustrated Kids
  • Real Simple
  • Food & Wine
  • Wallpaper

There are approximately 719,000 potential Class Members.

If you don’t qualify for this settlement, check out our database of other class action settlements you may be eligible for.


Settlement Amount

  • $7,400,000.00

Estimated Award

  • $25 – $50

The amount of your payment will depend on how many of the Settlement Class Members file valid and timely claims. Class Counsel anticipates will be approximately $25–50 per claimant.


Proof of Purchase

  • N/A

Claim Form

  • class action lawsuits

Time Magazine Settlement Notes

  • Carolyn Perlin v. Time Inc.
  • Case No.2:16-cv-10635
  • Pending in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan

Plaintiff Carolyn Perlin filed the class action lawsuit in February 2016 against Time Magazine the publisher of several magazines including Essence, Sports Illustrated, Entertainment Weekly, and Time, alleging the company disclosed its customers’ personal information to third parties in violation of the Michigan Video Rental Privacy Act. Perlin claims this information includes customers’ full names, home addresses, and reading habits.

“In order to facilitate its surreptitious multi-million dollar disclosure business, Time hides its practices from its subscribers, and neither notifies them nor obtains their permission before disclosing their personal reading information to unrelated third parties,” the lawsuit said.

Under the MVRP Act, companies are prohibited from disclosing the subscription and reading habits of consumers. The law is similar to the U.S. Video Privacy Protection Act, but goes a bit further in protecting information that reveals the reading, listening, and viewing preferences of Michigan residents.

Time denies it violated any law. Complete details about the case and settlement are provided on the Time Magazine Settlement website.

Two similar magazine subscriber privacy class action lawsuits were recently settled. The first against Trusted Media Brands, the publisher of magazines such as the Reader’s Digest was settled for $8.2 million. The other, against Wenner Media, the publisher of Rolling Stone, Men’s Journal, and US Weekly magazines was settled for $1.1 million. Both lawsuits alleged violations of Michigan’s VPRA and privacy statutes.

Class members who wish to exclude themselves or object to the terms of the Time Magazine Settlement must do so by September 14, 2018. Class members who wish to participate in the settlement must submit their claim form on or before November 29, 2018.


Important Dates

  • 11/29/18: Claim Form Deadline
  • 9/14/18: Objection or Exclusion Deadline
  • 10/15/18: Final Hearing at 2:00 pm ET* (class members do not need to attend this hearing in order to receive a slice of the settlement pie).

Settlement Class Members who wish to speak at the hearing should check www.TimeMagazineSettlement.com to confirm that the date or time of the Hearing has not been changed.


Contact Information

  • Mail: Magazine Subscriber Privacy Settlement Administrator, KCC Class Action Services LLC, P.O. Box 404075, Louisville, KY 40233-4075
  • Phone: 1-844-593-1080

Class Counsel

  • Eve-Lynn Rapp, Ari J. Scharg, Benjamin S, Thomassen, and Schuyler R. Ufkes of Edelson PC

Settlement Website

Facebook User Privacy Class Action Says Call & Text History Was Illegally Collected

Facebook is facing an unprecedented user privacy class action lawsuit accusing the social media giant of logging users’ phone calls and text message history.

Filed Tuesday in Northern California federal court, three Facebook users claim their privacy was violated when Facebook scraped call and text logs through the Facebook Messenger and Facebook Lite apps and exploited a vulnerability in users’ permission settings.

According to the Facebook user privacy class action lawsuit, plaintiffs Anthony Williams, Tyoka Brumfield, and Wendy Burnett share that when then installed the Facebook Messenger and Facebook Lite apps for Android, they granted permission for Facebook to access their “Contact List”, but did not consent to the scraping of their call and text logs.

When users install these apps, they are prompted to grant Facebook access to their “Contact List”. But upon doing so, the Facebook Messenger and Facebook Lite apps for Android “scrape users’ call and text logs”.

“Facebook takes call and text data going back years, including whether each call was “Incoming”, “Outgoing”, or “Missed,” the date and time of each call, the number dialed, the individual called, and the duration of the call. Facebook then incorporates this data into its profile on each user which it monetizes for advertising purposes,” the lawsuit states.

Nowadays, it seems with most messaging apps, we get a pop up notification on our phones asking permission to access our contacts. Most of us say yes without even really giving though to what that means. But think about it…by granting permission, you’ve just given companies like Facebook, access to all the phone numbers and contact data stored in your cell phone. Now every text or phone call you make is available to Facebook. Say you’re texting your mom about brunch plans. Next time you log on to the internet, you see ads for local restaurants or brunch deals. Seems like a coincidence? Well, it’s not. It part of the information Facebook collects from you and then monetizes for advertising purposes.

This practice of intruding on over 50 million users’ privacy and not disclosing that they were doing so is the center of the Facebook user privacy class action lawsuit. The plaintiffs all contend that while they were fine with Facebook accessing their contacts, what they are not okay with is they were not told that by using Facebook Messenger and Facebook Lite apps, years of their call and text logs could be scraped and then monetized for advertising purposes – all at the expense of users’ right to privacy.

The Facebook user privacy class action lawsuit does note that this vulnerability was fixed in October 2017 and Facebook reportedly stopped the practice of scraping users’ call and text logs. However, the data collected through the apps has never been purged.

The complaint comes on the heels of recent accusations that Facebook and Trump-related data analytics firm, Cambridge Analytica may have engaged in a data minin scheme, accessing users’ information without their permission during the 2016 presidential campaign. Specifically, the allegations say that Cambridge Analytica exploited 50 million Facebook users’ personal data in order to manipulate the election. Still, it doesn’t play well for Facebook.

Williams, Brumfield, and Burnett seek to represent a nationwide class of Facebook users who installed the Facebook Messenger and Facebook Lite apps for Android and granted Facebook permission to access their “Contact List”, along with a New York subclass. The Facebook privacy class action lawsuit is asking the court to grant compensatory, statutory, and punitive damages, along with an injunction requiring Facebook to purge it extant call and text logs acquired through Facebook Messenger and Facebook Lite apps.

The plaintiffs and the proposed Class are represented by L. Timothy Fisher and Scott A. Bursor of Bursor & Fisher PA. 

The Facebook User Privacy Class Action Lawsuit is Anthony Williams, et al. v. Facebook, Inc., Case No. 3:18-cv-01881-MEJ, in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.