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Nestle is facing a federal class action lawsuit alleging the food and beverage giant’s Pure Life Purified bottled water contains high levels of plastic contaminants, despite being marketed as being “Purified”.

Plaintiff Cindy Baker of Los Angeles says she was unaware of the true nature of Nestle Pure Life Purified bottled water when she purchased the drinking water for herself and her family. In bringing this class action lawsuit she hopes to hold Nestle responsible for its alleged deceptive advertising practices and misleading consumers in labeling their bottled drinking water as “pure” or “purified”.

“Defendants’ advertising, marketing, packaging, labeling and bottling is misleading, and misrepresents or omits important information to potential purchasers and consumers of Nestle Pure Life Purified bottled water,” the Nestle Pure Life Purified Bottled Water class action lawsuit states.

Recently the World Health Organization (WHO) announced that it was launching a review of the potential risks of plastic particles in certain bottled drinking water, including Nestle Pure Life Purified bottled water, after a study found high levels of tiny pieces of plastic in the samples tested. This testing and analysis was conducted at the State University of New York in Fredonia as a part of a project from the U.S.-based journalism organization, Orb Media. Of the tested bottled water brands, Nestle Pure Life Purified bottled water was found to contain high levels of plastic particles, with alarming rates of micro plastics per liter detected.

According to the Nestle Pure Life Purified Bottled Water class action lawsuit, the study found that Nestle Pure Life Purified bottled water contained various microplastics, including polypropylene, nylon, and polyethylene terephthalate. In one case, a bottle of Nestle Pure Life Purified bottled drinking water was found to contain more than 10,000 pieces of microplastics per liter of water.

Despite knowing that their bottled drinking water contained plastic particles, Nestle reportedly encouraged consumers to purchase Nestle Pure Life Purified bottled water and “intentionally, negligently and recklessly concealed and omitted the truth” about the quality and purity of its Pure Life Purified water.

Baker is seeking to represent four subclasses: California False Advertising, California Consumption, U.S. Purchase, and U.S. Consumption to include all persons who purchased Nestle Pure Life Purified bottled drinking water in the last four years.

Among monetary damages, the proposed class action lawsuit is asking the court to order Nestle to stop selling its Pure Life Purified bottled water since the bottled water.

Baker and the proposed Class are represented by Christopher J. Hamner, Evelina Serafini, and Manu J. Elloie of Hamner Law Offices APLC.

The Nestle Pure Life Purified Bottled Water Class Action Lawsuit is Baker et al. v. Nestle S.A., Case No. 18-cv-3097, in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.

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Comments
  1. Jennifer MacColl

    Great. I drink this water, I give this to my children. I do it to ENSURE SAFETY. THANKS ALOT NESTLE. GLAD you make money off lying and possibly causing life altering consequences to your consumers. Fantastic way to hurt people while making your company money.

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